Morning & Evening: A Daily Devotional Through the Writings of C. H. Spurgeon

Introduction

Alistair Begg has provided a wonderful service through his updating of Charles Haddon Spurgeon’s Morning and Evening. Begg recast the daily devotional from the King James version of the Bible, which Spurgeon would have used in the late nineteenth century, to the English Standard Version (ESV). As a believer who studied Scripture beginning in the 1980’d, I”m of course familiar with the New American Standard Version (NASB). Recently, I purchased the ESV Study Bible. Although there is nothing wrong with the KJV, the language is strange and awkward at times to twentieth century English speakers. So I appreciate Begg’s updating of Spurgeon’s devotional, as well as his updating Spurgeon’s use of the 19th century English language for twentieth century readers. However, this devotional is not about various versions of the Bible. In his rendition, Begg has maintained the power of Spurgeon as a preacher, as well as his love and faith in our glorious and powerful God.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Spurgeon lived a short life of 58 years from 1834-1892; but in that short life span he displayed quite an impact for Christ on the Church. He was only twenty years old when he began preaching. For thirty-eight years he held the pulpit at New Park Street Chapel, later known as the Metropolitan Tabernacle. Without hyperbole, he was probably the most popular pastor of the 19th century. He credited his conversion to a snow storm that blew him off course where he was headed to Methodist church, leading him instead to a Baptist Church. After hearing the sermon there, he stated that he had to rethink his entire approach to Christianity. Although he never completed a specific degree, he strongly believed in learning and became an avid reader, especially of the Puritan Divines. His personal library totaled some 12000 volumes.

Spurgeon became known as a powerful preacher and writer whose words pierced the soul of his readers. The strength of his writing springs from the pages of Morning and Evening. What comes across in these devotionals is Spurgeon’s worshipful love of God, who he presents in all his splendor, glory, power, and providential sovereignty..The impact of Spurgeon’s short life is seen in the fact that when he died in 1892, some 60000 people lined the streets as his body lay in state. On the day of his funeral, as the hearse transported his body from the Metropolitan Tabernacle to the cemetery, approximately 100000 people lined the streets during the funeral procession. Flags flew at half-mast, and many London businesses closed.

Spurgeon’s life was not without other contributions to society. He established as alms house and an orphanage in London, as well as a Pastor’s College that is still open today. He preached his last sermon in June of 1891 and died January 1892.

Morning and Evening

As the title makes clear, Spurgeon’s Morning and Evening is a daily devotional that readers engage for a full year. The devotional provides a morning and evening reading each day. This devotional is most definitely geared to the committed believer. Spurgeon’s theology comes through loud and clear extolling the character of God, his just judgment, his free grace, and his lovingkindness. Human effort to please God finds no place in Spurgeon’s writings. The power of his preaching and oratorical skills grab hold of the reader’s soul and will not let go. Many will find joyous tears brought forth by some of the passages that Spurgeon supplies. I definitely recommend this daily devotional for serious and committed Christians. If you are a new Christian, engage this work as well. You’ll find that Spurgeon’s passion for God will take you into a deeper and worshipful understanding of the Triune God. But make no mistake about it, In picking up this work, you’ll read the thoughts of a passionate evangelical, one who believes in the inerrancy and power of God’s word, and a Calvinist who extols the providence of an omnipotent, omniscient, and all-wise God. The work is Christ-centered, and lifts up Jesus Christ as the Son of God, born of a virgin, who died and shed blood for our sins, and was raised on the third day as a sign of God’s good pleasure. Alistair Begg, once again, has provided an amazing service to the church in his rendition of Spurgeon’s daily devotional.

Reference

Sourgeon, C. H. (2003), Morning and Evening. [Updated and Revised by Alistair Begg]. Wheaton, IL; Crossway Press.

John V. Jones, Jr., Ph.D./October 14th, 2021

BOOK REVIEW

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s